28 February 2013

Investiture at Buckingham Palace

The Queen held an Investiture at Buckingham Palace.
Click above for an article and video from the BBC.
The Frosted Sunflower does have a nice sparkle in video, don't you think?


Photo: BBC screencap

27 February 2013

Royal London Hospital

The Queen, accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh, opened the Royal London Hospital and the National Center for Bowel Research and Surgical Innovation.
Click above for video from ITN.
I'm never one to complain about purple or amethysts - but this outfit must have the least brooch variety of any in current rotation.


Photos:ITN screencap/Bauer Griffin

26 February 2013

Archbishop of Canterbury's Homage

The Queen received the new Archbishop of Canterbury, the Most Reverend Justin Welby, for an audience during which he 'did homage' as is tradition for new appointees. Her Majesty also received the Lieutenant Governor of Prince Edward Island and the Lieutenant Governor of British Columbia for audiences.
I do love the sound of these old traditions. All in a day's work for the Supreme Governor of the Church of England.


Photo: WPA Pool/Getty Images

20 February 2013

19 February 2013

The Delhi Durbar Bracelet

The Delhi Durbar Bracelet
Another Cambridge emerald piece made for Queen Mary for the Delhi Durbar, likely by Garrard, the bracelet that goes with the Delhi Durbar Parure includes three of those emeralds plus diamonds, all set in platinum and gold.
Queen Mary
 It was not the only bracelet Queen Mary wore with the Delhi Durbar Parure - there was an emerald bangle she was prone to, and a later Art Deco addition, to name two. But it is the one that is most consistently chosen to accompany the pieces since they passed to the Queen in 1953.
She usually wears an evening watch on one wrist, leaving one open for a bracelet to match the rest of what she's wearing.

And with that - we're done! There are other emerald jewels that may be switched in and out, but these are the core pieces of the Delhi Durbar Parure and those that use the Cambridge emeralds. They're all linked up below:

Click here to read more about the Cambridge emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure.

Photos: Royal Collection/Corbis

Audiences at Buckingham Palace

The Queen received the Thai Ambassador and the Ambassador of the Republic of San Marino at Buckingham Palace.
The Grima...not my favorite, but you gotta appreciate the variety.


Photo: PA

18 February 2013

The Round Cambridge Emerald Brooch

The Round Cambridge Emerald Brooch
The fraternal twin brooch to the Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch is this one, with a round cabochon Cambridge emerald surrounded by rows of diamonds and another Cambridge emerald suspended as a pendant.
The Duchess of Teck
Unlike other Cambridge emerald jewels in the collection, this one wasn't crafted especially for the Delhi Durbar. The round cabochon emerald surrounded by two rows of diamonds and the pear-shaped emerald pendant were in use when the Duchess of Teck owned the Cambridge set. She used them as detachable pieces on a stomacher she'd bought from Garrard; the diamond stomacher (which was also used with sapphires, or no additional pieces) passed to her son Adolphus and was worn by his wife Princess Alice.
Queen Mary
The emeralds, as we know, ended up with Queen Mary, and she often pinned the brooch and pendant below the Delhi Durbar Stomacher. She also wore it on its own, which is how it has been used since the Queen inherited it in 1953.
The brooch without the pendant
The top portion can be worn without the pendant, but the Queen almost always wears the brooch with the pendant attached.
The Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch is worn in the evening as well as the daytime, but this one is pretty much exclusively used in the day. It is also used more often than the scroll version.

Click here to read more about the Cambridge emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure.

Appearances:
12 January 2014: Church at Sandringham (No Pendant)
11 August 2013: Church at Balmoral (No Pendant)
23 July 2013: Queen's Award for Enterprise Reception
2011: State Visit to Ireland (No Pendant)
1980: Royal Maundy Service

Photos: Royal Collection/Leslie Field/Getty Images/Corbis

16 February 2013

The Delhi Durbar Stomacher and Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch

The Delhi Durbar Stomacher (left) and Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch (right)
Queen Mary loved a good stomacher, and the parure she created for the Delhi Durbar in 1911 wouldn't have been complete without one. There are seven of the gold-set cabochon Cambridge emeralds here and plenty of diamonds - including some of the chips from the famous Cullinan diamond. Two Cullinan brooches are used in the stomacher (and, obviously, can still be used on their own as well): the Cullinan V heart brooch, in the center of the top portion, and the Cullinan VIII emerald cut brooch. The Cullinan VIII is normally used with Cullinan VI suspended as a pendant, but in the Delhi Durbar stomacher it takes on the end emerald pendant instead.
Queen Mary with the stomacher
True to her pile-it-on tendencies, Mary sometimes wore other brooches as extensions of the stomacher. In her Delhi Durbar portrait (above, left), she pinned the Delhi Carved Emerald Brooch as a top piece; she also used a second Cambridge emerald brooch (the next topic in our series) as an addition to the bottom from time to time. Neither were integral to the design of the stomacher.
With the Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch alone (in the center of her bodice)
In addition to the Cullinan brooches stuck in the stomacher, the piece includes a removable emerald brooch.  The Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch (as I like to call it) is created by combining the central cushion-shaped emerald in its scrolled diamond setting with the bottom emerald pendant.
Along with the rest of the emeralds, the stomacher and brooches passed to the Queen in 1953. She doesn't use stomachers much, but she uses the Scroll brooch occasionally (and, of course, the separate Cullinan brooches). The Scroll brooch has been used for day occasions but it's also used in the evening, to pin ribands in place when using the other emeralds in the collection (both those in the same parure, and those in others - on the right above, the Queen uses other emerald jewels including pieces from the Emerald Tassel Parure).

Click here to read more about the Cambridge emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure.

Appearances:
8 April 2014: State Visit from Ireland 
1984: Royal Maundy Service 
1980: Christmas Broadcast    

Photos: Royal Collection/Leslie Field/Corbis/Getty Images

15 February 2013

Audiences at Buckingham Palace

The Queen received the Ambassador of the Republic of South Sudan and the Ambassador of the Republic of Croatia at Buckingham Palace.
Looks like we have a return of the Cullinan V Brooch - it had a bit of a slim year in 2012 (it spent its summer vacation on display at the Palace), perhaps it will make a come back in 2013.


Photo: AP

14 February 2013

The Art Deco Emerald Choker

The Art Deco Emerald Choker
This choker necklace is better known as the Cambridge Emerald Choker, since for years it was said to have been created by Queen Mary using more of her Cambridge emeralds. This was even the explanation posted at one point in time on the Royal Collection's site, but there's a new explanation in town now. The new description states that the emeralds were not the Cambridge emeralds, but a gift from the Ladies of India presented to Mary by the Maharanee of Patiala in December 1911. It seems there may have been confusion between this necklace and the Delhi Durbar Necklace in the past (the Delhi Durbar Necklace used to be referred to as the Ladies of India Necklace quite often, with the explanation that it had been presented by the Ladies of India; it has since been clarified that it was one of the pieces she had made for the Durbar ahead of time). I'd guess the recent research into the Queen's jewel collection for The Queen's Diamonds book and Jubilee exhibition has straightened a few things out.
Queen Mary, in the original version of the necklace and the revised version
The original gift of emeralds and diamonds from the Ladies of India was in the form of a slightly longer necklace worn by Queen Mary to the actual Delhi Durbar event. In 1921, she had Garrard redo the piece, creating an Art Deco style choker set in platinum. The new shorter necklace was perfect for Mary's signature layered jewel style, and she often paired it with the Delhi Durbar Necklace and multiple strands of diamonds.
Diana, Princess of Wales
The piece passed to the Queen in 1953, but she doesn't wear chokers often. So she loaned it to the Princess of Wales, who made it one of her signature jewels. Diana memorably wore it as a bandeau across her forehead, and wore it in necklace form both during and after her marriage. Since it was a lifetime loan, it returned to the Queen after Diana's death, and has since been exhibited at Buckingham Palace with other pieces of the Queen's jewelry. It hasn't been worn publicly by any member of the royal family since Diana, so the guessing game (when will it appear again, and who will wear it?) goes on.

Click here to read more about the Cambridge emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure.

Photos: Getty Images/Royal Collection 

Audience at Buckingham Palace

The Queen received the High Commissioner for St. Lucia at Buckingham Palace.
She's really back to the grind this week, isn't she? Go on Lil, we missed ya during the Sandringham drought.


Photo: AP

13 February 2013

The Delhi Durbar Necklace

The Delhi Durbar Necklace
Containing 9 bright green cabochon Cambridge emeralds of varying shapes, 6 large brilliant diamonds, chains of diamond brilliants, and one Cullinan diamond pendant (Cullinan VII, a marquise-cut 8.8 carat diamond and one of the pieces cut from the celebrated Cullinan diamond), this was made in advance of the Delhi Durbar by Garrard and the cost was met by King George V as a present for Queen Mary's 44th birthday.
Queen Mary (left) and the current Queen (right)
Mary changed the Cullinan pendant on at least one occasion and also wore the necklace without its distinctive asymmetrical pendants. We've seen none of that since 1953, when the Queen inherited it - but it has been a favorite to pair with the emerald version of the Grand Duchess Vladimir Tiara. It hasn't been worn in a while, though, since the Queen started sticking to a primarily white evening wardrobe.

Click here to read more about this necklace at Order of Splendor.
Click here to read more about the Cambridge emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure.

Appearances:
8 April 2014: State Visit from Ireland
1987: CHOGM Dinner
1955: State Opening of Parliament   

Photos: EPA/Corbis

Investiture at Buckingham Palace

The Queen held an Investiture at Buckingham Palace.
Click above to see a video from ITV.
Oh, second sighting in a just a couple months for this one - you pearl lovers should be happy!


Photo: ITV screencap

12 February 2013

The Delhi Durbar Earrings

The Delhi Durbar Earrings
The earrings belonging to the Delhi Durbar Parure are a simple and classic style: oval cabochon emeralds surrounded by 11 brilliant diamonds each. One of the emeralds used is from Queen Mary's collection of Cambridge emeralds; the other was supplied to match by Garrard, who made these earrings for Mary for the Delhi Durbar.
Queen Mary
Many parures of this size have intricate and impressive earrings to accompany them, so it's interesting that these are so simple and relatively small. But this was typical for Queen Mary, who seemed to prefer a smaller earring without a pendant. (Probably best for balance when you're planning on wearing 5 necklaces at once, I suppose.)
They passed to the Queen in 1953. Unlike Queen Mary, who pretty much wore these exclusively with the rest of this emerald parure, the Queen has other emerald earring options to occasionally swap in.

Click here to read more about the Cambridge emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure.

Appearances:
8 April 2014: State Visit from Ireland 
1955: State Opening of Parliament 

Photos: Royal Collection/Leslie Field/Corbis

Audiences at Buckingham Palace

The Queen received the Dutch Ambassador and the Ambassador of the Hellenic Republic at Buckingham Palace.
Looks like another appearance of the Tudor Rose Brooch - that's several appearances for a brooch that was new-to-us just last year, and now I'm really curious about its origins. (Also, that's a great suit for her!)


Photo: PA

11 February 2013

The Cambridge Emeralds and the Delhi Durbar Parure

Thanks to her grandmother Queen Mary, the Queen possesses an extensive and impressive parure of emeralds and diamonds. It includes emeralds given to Mary at the Delhi Durbar, the Indian celebration marking the start of George V's reign as King and Emperor (with Mary by his side as Queen and Empress) as well as the celebrated Cambridge emeralds.
The Cambridge emeralds have an interesting - and slightly juicy - past. They get their name from the Duchess of Cambridge - not the one we know today but Augusta of Hesse-Kassel, Queen Mary's grandmother. Augusta and her husband Prince Adolphus, the Duke of Cambridge and one of the sons of King George III, entered a lottery for charity on a stop in Frankfurt and won. Their prize was a box of cabochon emeralds (which according to some may once have belonged to Indian royalty). There are conflicting sources on the exact number of emeralds in the prize, but between 30 and 40 is probably most accurate.
Princess Mary Adelaide, the Duchess of Teck, wearing some of the emeralds
Augusta fashioned some of the emeralds into a pair of drop earrings and a pendant necklace. The emeralds were given to and inherited by her daughter, Mary Adelaide, the Duchess of Teck (Queen Mary's mother). Mary Adelaide occasionally wore some of the emeralds with a stomacher she had acquired from Garrard. On her death, the Cambridge emeralds passed to her son Prince Francis of Teck. Frank, as he was known, had a penchant for gambling and a penchant for Ellen Constance, the Countess of Kilmorey, a former mistress of King Edward VII. Frank died suddenly in 1910, at which time it was discovered he had bequeathed the precious family emeralds to none other than his married mistress.

Naturally, Frank's sister Queen Mary did not approve. She had Frank's will sealed, presumably to avoid a scandal just before she and her husband were to be crowned. (This became standard practice for royal wills from then on.) And she set about getting those emeralds back - because not only was she a magpie, she was a true lover of the family history and meaning behind her jewels. And family heirlooms leaving the family by way of the mistress, one can imagine, would just not do.

The tactics used by Mary to obtain jewels and other precious objects are often exaggerated (and sometimes not...) and sure enough, stories of social exile and so on for Ellen Constance can be found when it comes to Mary obtaining the Cambridge emeralds. It seems to me stories either go for the gossip or gloss over the awkwardness of the situation, simply stating that Mary "acquired" the emeralds. At any rate, Mary paid the Countess £10,000, a considerable sum which amounts to somewhere around £800,000 or more today. And she ended up with her emeralds.
Video: the Delhi Durbar
With the Cambridge emeralds in hand, Mary set about creating a parure for use at the Delhi Durbar. These pieces were added to with a few gifts given from Indian groups. Mary wore the whole parure at the Delhi Durbar, and continued to wear it for the rest of her life. She did alter some pieces as time went on, as she was prone to do. The whole parure is now with the Queen, almost all of it having been inherited on Queen Mary's death in 1953.
Queen Mary in her Delhi Durbar portrait, covered in the emerald parure
This mini-series covers the pieces that are most frequently worn with the parure, many of which were made specifically for the Delhi Durbar. This is not the entire collection of Windsor emeralds, nor does it encompass every piece that may have been paired with the Delhi Durbar pieces at one time or another. The jewels are linked below.
The Queen usually wears a toned down version of the parure (when compared to her grandmother)
One final note: There's a lot of conflicting information about this collection of emeralds; even "official" descriptions from the Royal Collection have been known to change. I'll do my best with accuracy as always, but just know that the Cambridge emeralds are a murky subject to start with.


The emerald pendants are Cambridge emeralds. This is the tiara the Queen would use today to cap the parure, and was used with the emeralds by Queen Mary in her later years.

The Delhi Durbar Tiara
This is the original tiara belonging to the parure, and was initially topped with Cambridge emeralds. Those emeralds today hang from the Grand Duchess Vladimir Tiara, though at one point in time they were also used as uprights on a diamond bandeau tiara inherited by the Duchess of Kent (which can be seen by clicking here). The Delhi Durbar Tiara is in the Queen's collection, but was last worn by the Duchess of Cornwall.

The Delhi Durbar Earrings
Made for the Delhi Durbar, the pair contains one Cambridge emerald.

The Art Deco Emerald Choker
A remade version of a necklace given to Queen Mary at the Delhi Durbar, the choker was worn by her with the rest of the parure and later loaned to Diana, Princess of Wales.

The Delhi Durbar Necklace
Containing 9 Cambridge emeralds, this necklace was made for the Delhi Durbar.

This was given to Queen Mary at the Delhi Durbar and was often worn by her as part of the full parure. The Queen wears it separately today.

The Delhi Durbar Stomacher and Scroll Cambridge Emerald Brooch
The stomacher created for the Durbar includes seven Cambridge emeralds, plus two of the brooches made with chips from the Cullinan diamond. The Queen uses the removable emerald brooch.

The Round Cambridge Emerald Brooch
One of the pieces that existed prior to the Delhi Durbar Parure creation, this pendant brooch has two Cambridge emeralds.

The Delhi Durbar Bracelet
With three Cambridge emeralds and diamonds, this is frequently the bracelet chosen by the Queen to accompany the parure and was one of the emerald bracelets Queen Mary wore with it.

Photos: Getty Images/Royal Collection

The Nizam of Hyderabad Rose Brooches and Necklace

For his wedding gift to Princess Elizabeth in 1947, the Nizam of Hyderabad opted for jewels from Cartier - gifts that were to be chosen by the bride herself. She selected two pieces from Cartier's existing stock, a diamond necklace and a tiara.
The Nizam of Hyderabad Tiara (with the large brooch in the center and the two smaller brooches on either side) and Princess Elizabeth wearing both the necklace and tiara
The floral tiara was composed of diamonds set in platinum. It featured three detachable rose brooches with en tremblant centers and a leafy background. The Queen wore the tiara in the years following her marriage, but she later opted to break it up. Most of the diamonds were used to create the Burmese Ruby Tiara, and the three rose brooches remain. (Click here to read more on the Nizam of Hyderabad Tiara, and here for more on the Burmese Ruby.)
The largest Nizam of Hyderabad Rose Brooch
There is one large brooch and two identical smaller brooches. The Queen almost always wears the smaller two as a pair and the larger one by itself; the larger brooch is more frequently worn, though it is not among her most used pieces.
Wearing the two smaller brooches as a set, and the larger brooch alone
The Nizam of Hyderabad necklace still remains. As it was a stock piece from the jeweler, it had existed for some years and had been sold and repurchased previously. At one point in time the central pendant was longer (containing three parts) and there were two additional pendants (each including two parts) on either side. The necklace had been simplified to its current form by the time it became one of the royal wedding gifts.
The Nizam of Hyderabad Necklace
As with many of her necklaces, the Queen did eventually shorten the chain to suit her tastes, and she still wears it from time to time today. It has been loaned to the Duchess of Cambridge, who wore the necklace for the first time in February 2014.

Appearances (all of the larger brooch, unless otherwise noted):
11 February 2014: National Portrait Gallery Gala (the necklace, worn by the Duchess of Cambridge)
11 July 2013: Coronation Festival Preview
25 June 2013: Queen Elizabeth Prize for Engineering
10 February 2013: Church at Sandringham
1998, 1999: Royal Maundy Service 
1971, 2001: Chelsea Flower Show
Various Years: CHOGM Dinners 

Photos: Cartier/Getty Images/Corbis/Royal Collection/AFP

10 February 2013

Church at Sandringham

The Queen, accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh, attended church at Sandringham.
Click above to see an article and picture from The Telegraph.
Brooch guesses? UPDATE: Looks like most of you say the Nizam of Hyderabad brooch, which was my initial guess too. We'll go with that.


Photo: Albanpix

05 February 2013

Queen Elizabeth Hospital

The Queen visited Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King's Lynn, near Sandringham, to open the new MRI unit.
Click above to see a video from ITV.
The Aquamarine Clips are back...objecting to last year's second place finish, no doubt.


Photo: ITV screencap

03 February 2013

Church at Sandringham

The Queen, accompanied by the Duke of Edinburgh, attended church near Sandringham.
Click above to see an article and video from EDP24.
It's a no brooch day today, but there are more appearances to come - an engagement this week and back to London soon.


Photo: EDP24 screencap